The future of architecture – Katy Ghahremani

We asked ten architects – each of whom joined Make in a different year since 2004 – to write about how they see architecture and the built environment changing over the next ten years. Here is the first of those responses.

 

Katy Ghahremani profile picture

Katy Ghahremani
Make Partner since 2004

As proven by empirical research (ZZA Responsive User Environments, 2011), ‘third place’ working is the new norm. The boundaries in people’s lives are blurring: there is no longer a clear-cut separation between work and play, in either physical location or time of day. We therefore require the spaces around us to change in the future, to reflect our new way of living, working and playing.

‘Third places’ blur the boundaries between activities and functions; coffee shops, private members’ clubs, library spaces, residents’ lounges – these are all private/public places that are not defined by a single activity. They are public to the extent that the user has no responsibility for their maintenance or management, yet they are private in that the users have some sort of commonality – either through geographical location or interest.

This concept is evolving into an everyday occurrence with the advancement of technology, yet the design of places and buildings is only just catching up. Enlightened developers and operators are investing in delivering these ‘third places’ within their buildings. Although it is difficult to quantify the revenue generated solely by these ‘third places’, we can see their impact in the increase in value of the building/development and the increase in interest by end-users and tenants.

Katy Ghahremani quote

We are now seeing this concept extend beyond the design of interiors into overall architecture and, on a bigger scale, masterplans. There is an increase in developers seeking architects who have a broader view of design and are less specialised in a particular typology. This will allow architects to be able to bring in ideas and concepts from other typologies – to create ‘third places’ both on a micro and a macro scale.

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