Tag Archives: 5 Broadgate

Lessons on future office design from Asia Pacific

By Ken Shuttleworth

I have been travelling through Asia Pacific again this summer, visiting our Hong Kong and Sydney studios and attending a whirlwind of meetings and tours across Hong Kong, China, Singapore and Australia.

It was, as always, fascinating and exciting. Some parts of this region have enormous vision and passion when it comes to their built environment, and you can see why their creative industries are flourishing and why the area attracts such a hotbed of talent.

That thought stayed with me as I spoke at a recent Cushman & Wakefield Insight breakfast in Sydney. It was great to be there – a genuine highlight of the trip. I discussed what we had learned at the British Council for Offices annual conference earlier this year and compared this with the market in Australia. It seems to me there is an interesting synergy between what I gleaned from the BCO and what I saw on my travels – that young talent and creativity are driving the development of the market and attracting more of the same. A cycle of creative demand, resolution and growth.

It’s clear that the ideals and trends of the millennial demographic – blurring the lines between work and home, finding community in new places, protecting our future – are infiltrating the way we design our office spaces, even for the most corporate of firms. The focus is now on flexibility and adaptability, on sustainability, on using technology to enable new methods of working, on community and amenities in the workplace.

London leads the world in many areas of workplace design, but when it comes to ‘agile working’ – a phrase that came up multiple times over the BCO conference and has become a buzzword in UK development circles – Australia is streets ahead of the UK. They put it down to being more ‘direct communicators’ (you can say that again!), but they also employ far greater levels of intelligence monitoring across their buildings.

Back in the day, agile working was known as ‘hot desking’, but technology has evolved (and so too the moniker) to enable this to be far more effective, with building systems in place that can track who is working, understand what they need and allocate space accordingly. This reduces desk numbers, makes the space more efficient and provides flexibility for future growth. Our 5 Broadgate development for UBS is the largest such scheme in London – agile working was a key factor in allowing the company to consolidate its London offices into one. But Australia is stealing a march on this. It’s a trend we should watch. There is a wealth of young, creative talent in that region of the world, and we should be looking and learning.

This idea of observation brings me to my last point: that of Brexit. Yes, all eyes of the world are on us, virtually everyone I met with queried or mentioned Brexit. It seems people are sceptical as to whether withdrawing from the EU is such a good idea. In this ‘local global’ world we live in, everyone has a stake or an investment in the UK, and the uncertainty around Brexit negotiations is having a concerning ripple effect.

In years to come we’ll be looking to our young, creative talents to help us navigate our place in the world. Let’s hope we leave them with the infrastructure to do it – both physically and metaphorically.

Originally posted on EG 14.09.2017

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Long life, loose fit

by James Goodfellow

‘The circular economy’ is a phrase that’s thankfully becoming increasingly well known within the built environment industry, but sadly one that seems to be taking much longer to action in a meaningful way. The concept of course is about reducing our reliance on raw materials, minimising waste, and maximising the longevity of the final product to get as long a life from it as possible before recycling the materials for use again. Essentially, it looks to replace the ‘Take, Make, Dispose’ linear economy that has dominated our culture for so long with a ‘Maintain, Reuse and Recycle’ circular one.

Linear economy

For us it’s quite simple. We try look at it as a ‘Long Life, Loose Fit’ approach. We see it as trying to get as much from a building and the process of constructing it as possible. This applies not only to the lifetime of the building itself but also to the materials used to construct it.

Circular economy

We as architects approach the circular economy at four levels, asking ourselves key questions at the start of the design process:

Firstly, at the very centre is the building. Can we maintain or repair an existing structure?
 Small changes to the way we design buildings now will help enormously later when buildings are broken down and recycled.

Circular economy - Building (c) Make

Take our 55 Baker Street project, in which the 1950s building was considered to be at the end of its life. We proposed retaining the existing structure, and we were able to keep over 70% of the concrete frame and 50% of the existing fabric. Internally, the soffits of the concrete slabs were exposed to provide thermal mass, and bespoke chilled beams were hung from the concrete ceilings to provide cooling. Externally, the cladding was upgraded to meet the highest standards through improved thermal and solar performance.

55 Baker Street construction

55 Baker Street

This brought the existing building up to modern-day standards and provided renewed life to a building that would have otherwise been demolished.

Circular economy - components

Next we assess the components. Could we reuse or redistribute parts of the current fabric, or can we introduce modular or prefabricated construction? Like Meccano, a much-loved childhood toy, what can be reused or changed? How can we make the most of different pieces of kit? At our Pure Hammersmith site, we used prefabricated units manufactured off-site and inserted a finished product into the building structure.

 

We can now design in a way that allows components to be removed or deconstructed in the future and reconditioned for use again.

Circular economy - elements

Thirdly, we analyse the elements. Can we use reclaimed or refurbished elements? And how can we optimise materials or bring repetition to our design to enhance what we have? With 5 Broadgate we optimised the size of the cladding panels to work within standard stainless steel coil widths, which minimised waste through offcuts.

Circular economy - materials

Finally, we consider the materials we use. This is really interesting for Make and something we embrace passionately. What is the recycled content of the materials we specify? What could it be? And what is their durability? The Copper Box was one of the few legacy buildings at the 2012 London Olympics, and we are now enormously proud to see this world-class sporting facility open to the community. The cladding has 70% recycled content, and you can see how it’s changing naturally over time, adding further intrigue to the building.

Copper Box

One day, all this copper will be rolled up and reused somewhere else. And that gives us enormous pride too.

5 Broadgate cladding

With 5 Broadgate we analysed all the components within the building, and when selecting materials considered the recycled content as part of the selection process. We then tracked all these elements through procurement and construction, enabling us to establish that 38.64% of total material value derives from reused and recycled content. By undertaking this study, we now have a benchmark to compare future projects against as we strive continue to take make further improvements.

 

So that’s four layers, each of which gives us the opportunity to maintain, reuse and recycle, and ensure a ‘Long Life, Loose Fit’ approach. The ultimate aim of course is to create a new generation of flexible buildings that extends the life of its constituents and that one day will be completely recyclable – something we believe is becoming increasingly plausible if we all embrace a circular economy.

Circular economy

 

 

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BIM

Johannes-Renner

 

 

Johannes Renner, Make’s project technology manager, discusses BIM and its increasingly important role in the design and delivery of projects.
 
With the advent of Building Information Modelling (BIM) and the move away from traditional two-dimensional drafting methods, we are fully aware of the implications this has for the future of architecture. The UK Government is heavily promoting and mandating the use of BIM on all its projects by 2016 and because of this, our clients are increasingly asking for BIM and, to some extent, simply expecting it! To meet and exceed client expectations, Make has been implementing BIM on new projects at the very early stages, because the provision of a BIM model gives certainty to the client and creates confidence in the final outcome.

However, at Make we are not just adopting BIM to fulfil what is required; we want to go further and leverage the power of this amazing new technology. By utilising the full spectrum that is available through the use of BIM, we can improve our efficiency and the ability to adjust quickly to changing demands. Using the model not just for drawing documentation and production but also to harvest building information to populate and create detailed schedules, is a huge benefit of this process.

We are currently using BIM on four large-scale projects, ranging from residential to mixed use and commercial buildings – including our state-of-the-art 5 Broadgate scheme, where we implemented BIM before other companies were even considering it, putting us way ahead of the competition.

5-Broadgate-Make-(c)John-Madden

By not restricting ourselves to just one BIM authoring software, we will always have access to the latest trends and innovations available from the building software industry. This gives us incredible flexibility to respond to different design challenges and client requirements, enabling us to improve collaboration and coordination with engineers, consultants and co-architects. Ultimately this means we always get the best available design solution for our clients.

We have established a core BIM group at Make, bringing together a wide range of expertise and experience. Having this team on hand provides valuable support to our design teams throughout the project lifecycle: from commencement through to design, construction and the hand-over of a data-rich model to the client at the end of the project.

MAKE_BIM_Strategy

Make’s BIM team gives ad-hoc advice to the architects to guide them through the process, as well as providing practical training and knowledge-sharing throughout the studio. This long-term approach gives us a competitive advantage and is helping us to get ready for the future, where BIM will be fully embedded in our daily work as a fundamental part of the design process. Additionally we always research how to connect new and different technologies developed across other industries, to further enhance the use of BIM models. We are now ready to take BIM to the next level.

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Put a lid on it

By Ben Stuart

Roofing solutions might not top the bill as the most glamorous part of a building, but get it right and they can be as memorable as any other element. Think of Wilkinson Eyre’s retractable engineering genius at Wimbledon or any one of Zaha’s sinuous structures.

But first and foremost the roof has to be functional, could we even argue here that form HAS to follow function? Alongside the aesthetics, a roof primarily has to be watertight, it also has to be well insulated to reduce energy consumption and in the case of 5 Broadgate – and the majority of commercial buildings – it has to be robust enough to hold a whole lot of plant equipment that forms the hidden engine of the building.

Roofing

5 Broadgate is a concrete decked, steel framed construction with a large, flat roof, virtually the size of a football pitch. ‘Hot melt’ roofing is often the go to solution for projects of this nature – whereby bitumen is heated to melting point and applied in two thin layers, with a reinforcement layer between. British Land has used hot melt on the majority of their buildings on the Broadgate estate to date, even as far back as the first buildings in 1984, so they have first-hand experience of its reliability and durability.

5 Broadgate roofing installation

One of its primary benefits over alternative solutions is the speed with which it can be applied. On a project of this size, many of the construction packages are deliberately overlapped in order to accelerate the process. With a hot melt solution a second layer can be applied almost immediately onto the first, tested for leaks and the insulation installed. This was an important advantage because it allowed for the plant-supporting concrete overslab to be laid fairly quickly, a crucial factor on a site that’s home to 1,000 construction workers and over 700 tonnes of plant.

5 Broadgate roof

But it’s not a panacea – a hybrid solution with cold plastics was employed on several tricky details where the membrane was penetrated. And although hot melt is 50 per cent recyclable, it’s not the most sustainable solution on the market.

Creativity in roofing materials is still needed – even if it is purely for function rather than form – certainly if waterproof concrete or a cold plastic solution is advanced enough to bring down the cost and timescale factors, they’ll undoubtedly take the place of hot melt as the go-to-roofing-solution for buildings of this nature.

5 Broadgate roof5 Broadgate roof

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The future of architecture – Matthew Bugg

We asked ten architects – each of whom joined Make in a different year since 2004 – to write about how they see architecture and the built environment changing over the next ten years. Here is Matt’s response.

Matthew Bugg
Matthew Bugg
Make Partner since 2007

I predict more intensive studies of materials and construction methods throughout the design of commercial buildings over the next decade. This is already happening on our 5 Broadgate project, where extensive material research has driven energy performance targets. Energy use will continue to drive design and this will be coupled by expanding research through education. BIM (Building Information Modelling) will allow materials and construction methodologies to be harnessed alongside costs, to further inform our clients earlier in the design process. Rapid design iterations will become the norm.

Matt pull quote

I also see social networking tools becoming prevalent in connecting architects with new clients and maintaining relationships with the best collaborators. These tools, which will become part of a designer’s daily work, will also help to make new connections and relationships which may not have previously come about. The globalisation of ideas has already ignited a new thinking structure based on these rapidly evolving social networks.

Physical architecture will be able to adapt to these new networks by harnessing micro-technologies. Small computers like the Raspberry Pi released this year could be embedded in architectural components, to record performance but also to communicate with other components – and perhaps even other buildings. There will be a lot more work ‘on the go’ and whether software or hardware, both will develop to place us in the best location for the design task.

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Responsible resourcing should be an integral part of every project

An independently verifiable procurement process will make us more accountable for the products we supply, specify or use

Earlier this year one of our architects, James Goodfellow, took part in a panel seminar at EcoBuild to discuss responsible sourcing, a topic which is quite rightly creeping up the agenda of many architects and is something we at Make are very focused on, especially for our 5 Broadgate project on behalf of British Land. (see James’ earlier blog post)

It requires the holistic examination of the product and the supply chain so that one is fully conscious of whether they meet environmental, social and economic requirements; from extraction, through processing and supply, right to the specification and ultimate re-use or disposal of the product.

There is no doubt that truly responsible sourcing can be a minefield. Essentially it requires the entire procurement process to be verifiable through independent sources, much like you find with FSC timber or fairtrade. The publication of the BES-6001 standard promotes responsible sourcing and provides clear guidance on the framework and governance that is required to ensure that the environmental and social aspects are addressed.

Likewise in the manufacturing process, the wellbeing of employees and the release of pollutants has to be considered. These issues are further compounded by long supply chains; the complexities for smaller enterprises in trying to meet assessment criteria and perhaps most importantly of all, creating standards that are internationally acknowledged.

A number of architects, suppliers and contractors are already leading the march on responsible sourcing, and there is increasing pressure from clients, the government and indeed the consumer public, for all of us to demand traceability and be more accountable for the products we supply, specify and use.

Responsible sourcing is something that should be embedded into the design process from the offset and the fact that BRE and British Standards have developed their own frameworks for governance can only be applauded.  But we should continue to demand that more products, and their associated supply chains are evaluated to meet these standards, for as Sarah Cary, sustainable development executive at British Land, said at the EcoBuild responsible sourcing seminar: “There’s nothing like a horsemeat scandal to get us all interested in where things come from.”  We all have a duty to be accountable for the product and its procurement to determine whether it is acceptable.  Frankly it is time responsible sourcing became an integral part of every construction project and procurement process.

Originally posted on Ken Shuttleworth's Building magazine column. 
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Responsible sourcing starts with design

by James Goodfellow

“There’s nothing like a horsemeat scandal to get us all interested in where things come from”, said Sarah Cary, sustainable development executive at British Land, when she introduced the responsible sourcing seminar at this year’s Ecobuild.

Too true.

Responsible sourcing is not a new concept at all, although it is still relatively new in the construction industry. Understanding where the products and materials we specify come from and what their impact is on the environment is so important that we must obtain an understanding of their traceability through the supply chain. It’s time that responsible sourcing became the big topic and was an integral part of every construction project.

What is responsible sourcing?

Responsible sourcing is a holistic approach to the way in which building products and construction materials are extracted, processed, supplied and used on site. It also takes into account the way materials can be re-used, recycled or disposed of when they reach they end of their lifecycle.

It requires the examination of a product and its supplier and whether they meet certain sustainability, environmental, social and economic requirements.

Why is it important?

Construction projects are one of the biggest drains on our world’s resources. From the materials we extract from the earth to the carbon emissions released during construction to the final energy requirements of the completed building. It is vital that each project makes as little negative impact on the environment as possible; benefits the communities involved in the production or supply of materials; and meets certain health, safety and quality standards so as to improve the life of the building and those using it.

Make’s approach to responsible sourcing in design

The Gateway Building is a biosciences research facility for the University of Nottingham. 5 Broadgate is the new London corporate headquarters for financial services company UBS.  These two buildings could not be more different in size, scale, use, location and requirements; however where they converge is in how best practice was ensured throughout the design process.

The Gateway Building, University of Nottingham

The Gateway Building, University of Nottingham

The materials used in The Gateway Building’s cladding reflect the campus’s agriculture heritage by bringing together three sustainable materials: wood, straw and render. Local sourcing was key in procuring the materials with the aim of not only reducing embodied carbon through transportation but also bringing employment to the local community.

Locally sourced materials for The Gateway Building

Locally sourced materials for The Gateway Building

Being an agricultural campus the straw was locally produced by the university on their neighbouring fields. A pop-up factory was then set up in a barn less than five miles from the site where the timber, straw and render were prefabricated into 14m long cassettes.  This meant the materials were assembled in a controlled environment that was extremely close to both the source of the materials and the construction site. The windows were also sourced and fabricated down the road less than 10 miles from the site.

5 Broadgate on the other hand is a large office block in the heart of the City of London. High sustainability targets have been set for the project by both the occupier, UBS and the developers, British Land.

5 Broadgate, London, UK

5 Broadgate, London, UK

Supply chain interrogation helped us make informed design decisions early on and assisted in the sustainable procurement of materials. We looked at every component specified within the building, comparing the sustainability criteria for different options including their embodied energy and recycled content. For example, these decisions meant we were able to mitigate 360 tons in CO2 equivalents on the façade alone.

Life cycle comparison of materials for 5 Broadgate

Life cycle comparison of materials for 5 Broadgate

We further defined our sustainability requirements during the tender process by producing specific sustainability requirements for all potential contractors. They were required to confirm and demonstrate compliance at tender stage and offer improvements where possible. We’ve found that it is easier to get data from suppliers at tender stage while they are keen for the job rather than after they are appointed!

Once appointed we continue to work with the supply chain to maximise material optimisation and minimise wastage as the design develops. We also work with the contractors to find further ways to minimise transportation and carbon emissions during production and this is being monitored on a project wide basis.

Summary

Two very different projects with different briefs and different opportunities. But by placing sustainability at the heart of the decision-making process and putting a strong focus on material research and supply chain interrogation, we made informed decisions that ensured the buildings were responsibly sourced.

As Derek Hughes, responsible sourcing scheme manager at BRE Global so aptly put it: “We’re all used to seeing fair trade in our coffee, but why not fair trade in our concrete?”

Notes
James Goodfellow recently presented ‘Responsible sourcing – the design process’ at Ecobuild 2013. You can download James’s presentation from the Ecobuild website or follow him on Twitter: @jamesgoodfellow 
Sarah Cary works with British Land’s project teams to drive sustainable design, responsible construction and ethical procurement. Read Sarah’s blog or follow her on Twitter: @sarahcary 
 
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